stopreadingmyjournalyounosybastard (rattbastard) wrote in rate_the_freak,
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James Madison to the rescue
The Texas Republican Platform declares, in writing, underlined and bolded, that America is a Christian Nation.

Imagine our surprise.

So, for anyone trapped in a hopeless argument with deluded people who insist that the Texas Repubs are RIGHT, here are some links that might help:
http://www.postfun.com/pfp/worbois.html
http://www.ffrf.org/nontracts/?t=xian.txt
http://www.infidels.org/library/modern/farrell_till/myth.html
http://www.au.org/site/PageServer
http://jeromekahn123.tripod.com/christianity/id3.html

I'm going to quote from "A Memorial and Remonstrance Against Religious Assessments" because even in 1785 my boy James Madison could bring it. Madison objected to a Virginia Commonwealth bill offering a tax whose benefits would go to teachers of Christianity. He wrote this

1. Because we hold it for a fundamental and undeniable truth, "that religion or the duty which we owe our Creator and the manner of discharging it, can be directed only by reason and conviction, not by force or violence."

2. Because Religion be exempt from the authority of the Society at large, still less can it be subject to that of the Legislative Body.

3. Because it is proper to take alarm at the first experiment on our liberties. We hold this prudent jealousy to be the first duty of Citizens, and one of the noblest characteristics of the late Revolution.

4. Because the Bill violates the equality which ought to be the basis of every law, and which is more indispensible, in proportion as the validity or expediency of any law is more liable to be impeached. If "all men are by nature equally free and independent," all men are to be considered as entering into Society on equal conditions; as relinquishing no more, and therefore retaining no less, one than another, of their natural rights.

5. Because the Bill implies either that the Civil Magistrate is a competent Judge of Religious Truth; or that he may employ Religion as an engine of Civil policy.

6. Because the establishment proposed by the Bill is not requisite for the support of the Christian Religion.

7. Because experience witnesseth that eccelsiastical establishments, instead of maintaining the purity and efficacy of Religion, have had a contrary operation.

8. Because the establishment in question is not necessary for the support of Civil Government.

9. Because the proposed establishment is a departure from the generous policy, which, offering an Asylum to the persecuted and oppressed of every Nation and Religion, promised a lustre to our country, and an accession to the number of its citizens. What a melancholy mark is the Bill of sudden degeneracy? Instead of holding forth an Asylum to the persecuted, it is itself a signal of persecution. It degrades from the equal rank of Citizens all those whose opinions in Religion do not bend to those of the Legislative authority.

10. Because it will have a like tendency to banish our Citizens.

11. Because it will destroy that moderation and harmony which the forbearance of our laws to intermeddle with Religion has produced among its several sects.

12. Because the policy of the Bill is adverse to the diffusion of the light of Christianity.

13. Because attempts to enforce by legal sanctions, acts obnoxious to go great a proportion of Citizens, tend to enervate the laws in general, and to slacken the bands of Society.

14. Because a measure of such singular magnitude and delicacy ought not to be imposed, without the clearest evidence that it is called for by a majority of citizens, and no satisfactory method is yet proposed by which the voice of the majority in this case may be determined, or its influence secured.

15. Because finally, "the equal right of every citizen to the free exercise of his Religion according to the dictates of conscience" is held by the same tenure with all our other rights. If we recur to its origin, it is equally the gift of nature; if we weigh its importance, it cannot be less dear to us; if we consult the "Declaration of those rights which pertain to the good people of Vriginia, as the basis and foundation of Government," it is enumerated with equal solemnity, or rather studied emphasis.

***

The entire Remonstrance can be found
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<B>James Madison to the rescue</B>
The Texas Republican Platform declares, in writing, underlined and bolded, that America is a Christian Nation.

Imagine our surprise.

So, for anyone trapped in a hopeless argument with deluded people who insist that the Texas Repubs are RIGHT, here are some links that might help:
http://www.postfun.com/pfp/worbois.html
http://www.ffrf.org/nontracts/?t=xian.txt
http://www.infidels.org/library/modern/farrell_till/myth.html
http://www.au.org/site/PageServer
http://jeromekahn123.tripod.com/christianity/id3.html

I'm going to quote from "A Memorial and Remonstrance Against Religious Assessments" because even in 1785 my boy James Madison could bring it. Madison objected to a Virginia Commonwealth bill offering a tax whose benefits would go to teachers of Christianity. He wrote this <lj-cut text="Remonstrance">

1. <B>Because</B> we hold it for a fundamental and undeniable truth, "that religion or the duty which we owe our Creator and the manner of discharging it, can be directed only by reason and conviction, not by force or violence."

2. <B>Because</B> Religion be exempt from the authority of the Society at large, still less can it be subject to that of the Legislative Body.

3.<B> Because</B> it is proper to take alarm at the first experiment on our liberties. We hold this prudent jealousy to be the first duty of Citizens, and one of the noblest characteristics of the late Revolution.

4. <B>Because</B> the Bill violates the equality which ought to be the basis of every law, and which is more indispensible, in proportion as the validity or expediency of any law is more liable to be impeached. If "all men are by nature equally free and independent," all men are to be considered as entering into Society on equal conditions; as relinquishing no more, and therefore retaining no less, one than another, of their natural rights.

5. <B>Because</B> the Bill implies either that the Civil Magistrate is a competent Judge of Religious Truth; or that he may employ Religion as an engine of Civil policy.

6.<B> Because</B> the establishment proposed by the Bill is not requisite for the support of the Christian Religion.

7. <B>Because</B> experience witnesseth that eccelsiastical establishments, instead of maintaining the purity and efficacy of Religion, have had a contrary operation.

8. <B>Because</B> the establishment in question is not necessary for the support of Civil Government.

9.<B> Because</B> the proposed establishment is a departure from the generous policy, which, offering an Asylum to the persecuted and oppressed of every Nation and Religion, promised a lustre to our country, and an accession to the number of its citizens. What a melancholy mark is the Bill of sudden degeneracy? Instead of holding forth an Asylum to the persecuted, it is itself a signal of persecution. It degrades from the equal rank of Citizens all those whose opinions in Religion do not bend to those of the Legislative authority.

10. <B>Because</B> it will have a like tendency to banish our Citizens.

11. <B>Because</B> it will destroy that moderation and harmony which the forbearance of our laws to intermeddle with Religion has produced among its several sects.

12. <b>Because</B> the policy of the Bill is adverse to the diffusion of the light of Christianity.

13. <B>Because</B> attempts to enforce by legal sanctions, acts obnoxious to go great a proportion of Citizens, tend to enervate the laws in general, and to slacken the bands of Society.

14. <B>Because</B> a measure of such singular magnitude and delicacy ought not to be imposed, without the clearest evidence that it is called for by a majority of citizens, and no satisfactory method is yet proposed by which the voice of the majority in this case may be determined, or its influence secured.

15. <B>Because</B> finally, "the equal right of every citizen to the free exercise of his Religion according to the dictates of conscience" is held by the same tenure with all our other rights. If we recur to its origin, it is equally the gift of nature; if we weigh its importance, it cannot be less dear to us; if we consult the "Declaration of those rights which pertain to the good people of Vriginia, as the basis and foundation of Government," it is enumerated with equal solemnity, or rather studied emphasis.

***

The entire Remonstrance can be found <a href="http://religiousfreedom.lib.virginia.edu/sacred/madison_m&r_1785.html"here.</a>

***

Shavua Tov, everyone.
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